CURRENT

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Surfacing Histories Sculpting Memories
Presented by the San Francisco Advocacy for the National Museum of Women in the Arts
CCA Hubbell Street Galleries
161 Hubbell Street | San Francisco, CA
On View: September 3rd - October 4th

Held in conjunction with the National Museum of Women in the Arts 2020 Women to Watch exhibition series, Surfacing Histories Sculpting Memories features work by five Bay Area artists working with paper including Sofía Córdova (MFA, 2010), Julia Goodman (MFA, 2009), Sandra Ono, Amy Tavern (MFA, 2017), and Lava Thomas. Looking Back 1 and Looking Back 2, two monumental portraits of Thomas’s southern ancestors, will be on view. For more information, click here.


Works by Martin Puryear, Kerry James Marshall, Lava Thomas, and Gee's Bend Quilters.

Works by Martin Puryear, Kerry James Marshall, Lava Thomas, and Gee's Bend Quilters.

Personal to Political: Celebrating the African American Artists of Paulson Fontaine Press
Museum of Arts and Sciences
352 S Nova Road | Daytona Beach, Florida
On View: August 31 - October 27, 2019

Personal to Political: Celebrating the African American Artists of Paulson Fontaine Press is traveling to MOAS in Florida, an affiliate of the Smithsonian Institution. The exhibition features works by African American artists who have helped to shape the contemporary art conversation in the Bay Area and beyond. The show covers a wide range of prints, paintings, quilts, and sculptures, and includes an array of abstract and formal imagery. Narratives that speak to personal experiences and political perspectives are woven throughout. Personal to Political features works by Edgar Arceneaux, Radcliffe Bailey, McArthur Binion, Gee's Bend Quilters (Louisiana Bendolph, Mary Lee Bendolph, Loretta Bennett, Loretta Pettway), Lonnie Holley, David Huffman, Samuel Levi Jones, Kerry James Marshall, Martin Puryear, Gary Simmons, and Lava Thomas. The exhibition will travel through 2022 | More information here


Requiem for Charleston,  2016. On view in the Lincoln Gallery at the Smithsonian American Art Museum.

Requiem for Charleston, 2016. On view in the Lincoln Gallery at the Smithsonian American Art Museum.

Requiem for Charleston
Smithsonian American Art Museum
F St NW & 8th St NW, Washington, DC
On view in the Lincoln Gallery


Requiem for Charleston considers the events of June 17, 2015, when nine men and women were shot by a white gunman inside one of the country’s oldest historically black churches in Charleston, South Carolina. The installation consists of 25 tambourines whose drums have been replaced with black lambskin, referring to the quintessential symbol of innocence and sacrifice. Thomas inscribed nine of the tambourines with the names of the murdered men and woman; others were left blank in tribute to the many men, women and children who have died in attacks on black churches. 

This work is discussed by the artist in the SAAM panel, "Contemporary Artists in Conversation with History: 1968,"  with Alfredo Jaar, Sam Giliiam, and E. Carmen Ramos. Watch here