CURRENT

Belly Eggs,  2008.

Belly Eggs, 2008.

My Silences Had Not Protected Me
An Exhibition in Partnership with For Freedoms
5 Ninth Ave, New York
November 8 - December 22


My work is included in the group exhibition, My Silences Had Not Protected Me, organized by Lucy Beni and Emma Nuzzo. Presented by Fort Gansevoort in collaboration with For Freedoms, a platform for creative civic engagement, discourse, and direct action for artists, My Silences Had Not Protected Me unites a collection of artists who together represent the multidimensional intricacies of sexuality and its inherent relationship to power. The exhibition includes works by Marilyn Minter, Carrie Mae Weems, Carolee Schneemann, and Ana Mendieta, among others.

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Freedom Song No. 1,  2018.

Freedom Song No. 1, 2018.

Pretty Big Things
Walter Maciel Gallery
2642 S. La Cienega Blvd., Los Angeles, CA
November 3 - December 22, 2018

Curated by Brenda Williams, Pretty Big Things is a group exhibition representing the future energy of optimism and possibility that our society needs to move forward. Through vibrant new work that embraces mindfulness, meditation, and positive anticipation, the exhibition will create a moment of reflection on the positive energy forces in our lives. 

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Resistance Reverb: Movements 1 & 2 , 2018. On view at the di Rosa Center for Contemporary Art through December 30.

Resistance Reverb: Movements 1 & 2, 2018. On view at the di Rosa Center for Contemporary Art through December 30.

Be Not Still: Living in Uncertain Times
di Rosa Center for Contemporary Art
5200 Sonoma Hwy, Napa, CA
June 23 - December 30


Be Not Still: Living in Uncertain Times addresses concerns of our present social and political moment through newly commissioned works of art that engage audiences in ideas that matter. Other artists in the exhibition are Lexa Walsh, Ranu Mukherjee, and Victor Cartagena. 

Press Release | Brochure


Requiem for Charleston,  2016. On view in the Lincoln Gallery at the Smithsonian American Art Museum.

Requiem for Charleston, 2016. On view in the Lincoln Gallery at the Smithsonian American Art Museum.

Requiem for Charleston
Smithsonian American Art Museum
F St NW & 8th St NW, Washington, DC
On view in the Lincoln Gallery


Requiem for Charleston considers the events of June 17, 2015, when nine men and women were shot by a white gunman inside one of the country’s oldest historically black churches in Charleston, South Carolina. The installation consists of 25 tambourines whose drums have been replaced with black lambskin, referring to the quintessential symbol of innocence and sacrifice. Thomas inscribed nine of the tambourines with the names of the murdered men and woman; others were left blank in tribute to the many men, women and children who have died in attacks on black churches. 

This work is discussed by the artist in the SAAM panel, "Contemporary Artists in Conversation with History: 1968,"  with Alfredo Jaar, Sam Giliiam, and E. Carmen Ramos. Watch here